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Australia, naturally

The official guide to Australia's iconic national parks

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travel

Walking on sunshine at Uluru

Just a big rock? Guest bloggers and photographers, Corinne Le Gall and Maree Clout take the 10.6 km base walk around Uluru

Photographically, Uluru is a visual delight. The scenery changes constantly, as does the mood of the landscape. Some parts are dry and sandy, just like you’d expect in a desert environment, while other parts are surprisingly vegetated and lush.

Continue reading “Walking on sunshine at Uluru”

How to become a birder just in time for Kakadu’s Bird Week

I like the idea of bird watching. When I think about the cockatoos and rainbow lorikeets that make my neighbourhood home, I love how they fly and shred eucalypts in community, I think their plumage is magnificent, and they have so much character in their eyes. But how do I make the most of this? I know I need binoculars …

Continue reading “How to become a birder just in time for Kakadu’s Bird Week”

Five favourite photos from Booderee

Booderee is one of the most photogenic places in Australia – and that’s up against some stiff competition!  Continue reading “Five favourite photos from Booderee”

Recognise signs of dehydration

Temperatures regularly reach 30 degrees Celsius or more at Uluru. Over the summer period (October to March) there is a risk of serious heat-related incidents when walking in the park. When it’s very hot it’s important to walk only in the cooler parts of the day – in summer we strongly recommend you walk only in the early morning before 11.00 am. Continue reading “Recognise signs of dehydration”

Stay safe in Uluru’s extreme temperatures

Uluru is both a beautiful, and harsh, environment. Temperatures regularly reach 30 degrees Celcius – and when they reach 36 degrees Celcius we call them extreme temperatures. Heat exhaustion and dehydration are very real dangers here.

These simple steps will help to keep you and your family safe while out walking in our park. Continue reading “Stay safe in Uluru’s extreme temperatures”

The red crab migration in numbers

50 million  The number of red crabs on Christmas Island!

100,000 The eggs a single female can brood Continue reading “The red crab migration in numbers”

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